Tuesday, 9 September 2014

Book Review by Adeyinka Makinde in the latest issue of Covert Policing, Terrorism & Intelligence Law Review (No.2 of 2014)

I have contributed a review of Calder Walton’s book Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire to issue 2 of Covert Policing, Terrorism and Intelligence Law Review which is published by McKay Law.

Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire, Calder Walton
 

(Harper Press, 2013)
 

ISBN: 978-0007457960, 411pp., £25

 
The process of historical inquiry is a never-ending one. It is not enough merely to record the outcome of a momentous happening such as that of a revolution, or a great battle or the disintegration of an empire. What remains of paramount importance is the need to develop a greater level of understanding of the underlying forces which facilitated such occurrence.

 
The availability of previously unavailable caches of credible information may serve to afford a fresh perspective; it can offer opportunities for more detailed analysis and ultimately can provide the basis for re-thinking the understanding of such epochal events.

 
Calder Walton’s Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire evidently has such ambitions.

CONTINUES.
 

To subscribe to Covert Policing, Terrorism and Intelligence Law Review, visit www.mckaylaw.co.uk or  email Phillip Rushworth at Philip.rushworth@mckaylaw.co.uk

Copies of articles can be obtained from McKay Law Solicitors and Advocates. The current rates are £20 per article for orders delivered by email and £20 plus postage per article for orders delivered by post.

This following information on this journal is culled from www.mckaylaw.co.uk:

The Covert Policing, Terrorism & Intelligence Law Review is a quarterly peer reviewed journal which provides essential up-to-date analysis of the theory and practice of these rapidly changing areas of the law.

This re-launched journal builds on the reputation established by its predecessor the Covert Policing Review which was described by the former Surveillance Commissioner as having the potential to be “a classic of its kind”

The key aim of the journal is to provide critical commentary and analysis within these important areas of policing and legal practice and the Covert Policing, Terrorism and Intelligence Law Review is the only such journal in the UK dedicated to this topic.

Format


The journal is currently available in print format and offers practical insight and legal analysis through:

  • an editorial written by Simon McKay;
  • articles and discussion pieces;
  • recent and relevant case reviews; and
  • a book review section.

This title is therefore essential reading for academics, legal professionals, students and those working in the areas of covert policing and intelligence.

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